HUMAN RESOURCE: HOW CAN HUMAN RESOURCE ADD VALUE TO AN ORGANIZATION

We all want to feel valued; it is a need embedded in our nature and plays a huge part in that which keeps us motivated on a daily basis. Often, the role of HR is to make employees feel valued within a company. But what if the value of the Human Resources department is itself called into question?

Most of us have dealt with HR at some stage, but the full potential of the HR department often gets confused, or goes unrecognized. The common perception of HR seems to be limited to making sure staff are hired, paid on time, and made to feel comfortable in their jobs.

Budding new technologies are enabling many routine processes to be automated, whilst specialised, external shared-service organisations can provide many traditional HR functions. The combined result raises the question: ‘have we made internal HR redundant?

CONSEQUENCES OF POOR HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION: HOW RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION AFFECT THE ORGANIZATION

  • How does the job role of HR function?

We all have a general idea of what HR represents, and are familiar with the typical duties of the Human Resources department within an organisation: HR professionals function as ‘people people’; therefore, they are responsible for hiring (and sometimes firing) employees, and making efforts to retain them with benefits such as annual leave allowance, shares in the company, or fertility benefits. They also handle contracts, and sometimes payroll requirements. 

However these rudimentary HR duties already involve more than first meets the eye. For example, HR are often required to take the appropriate action when a disgruntled former employee files a wrongful termination lawsuit; it is therefore necessary that they keep up to speed with current employee laws to protect their organisations.

Hiring for a modern business, it is not enough to simply post a ‘help wanted’ sign and ask a few general questions; HR responsibilities include creating systems which allow them to attract, hire, train, and retain new employees of a suitable calibre. This involves developing appropriate interview stages and non-discriminatory screening processes, alongside further employee evaluation tools.

  • Which new ways can HR add value?

As a non-revenue generating component of an organisation’s structure, HR departments often find themselves arguing their case, with many organisations choosing to outsource the responsibilities for a lower cost. However, whilst they may seem like an extra weight to carry, HR departments can prove their overall worth in a number of strategic ways.

A valuable HR department is a proactive one; instead of taking a reactive stance where employment conditions are concerned, modern HR strategies are seeing professionals participate more strongly in planning. But whether orchestrating a radical shift, or a more gradual evolution, HR leadership should function with a strategic eye towards their employees. Within this scope are several functions, such as organisational concerns, common processes, and evaluation of job roles and competencies.

Whilst the department itself may not be one to generate revenue, it can be used as a force for change within an organisation. It can do this by implementing a strategy which streamlines processes, decreases outgoings, and maximises the efficiency of those departments which do generate revenue. Whilst these actions fall outside the traditional remit of Human Resources, when properly executed, they can significantly impact an organisation.

  • Know your value

In order to add any value of significance to an organization, a HR department must be allowed to facilitate the greater strategic vision of a business – one which comes from people with close knowledge of the business, and cannot be outsourced or automated. If a company holds its employees in high regard, then the Human Resources department should be at the core of their strategy. By enabling and supporting this vision, the value of a good HR team cannot be overstated.

CONSEQUENCES OF POOR HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING

Human Resources (HR) Planning is integral to the efficient running and continued success of businesses, enterprises, and even start-up companies. At times, many corporations and business owners due to circumstances, certain business factors, or extraneous issues have a badly mismanaged top management tier and inconsequential HR departments. The resultant poor human resource planning has an immediate and long-term impact on organizational functioning, employee recruitment, and management policies, and corporate profitability.

ROLE OF HR IN BUSINESS STRATEGY

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION: HOW RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION AFFECT THE ORGANIZATION

Poor HR Planning and Management

An incompetent and poorly functioning human resources department reflects the overall state of affairs of an organization and its possible uncompetitive position in the marketplace. There is a disconnect between the HR department and the executive management leading to miscommunication, poor decision making on operational aspects, and critical mistakes. Employee training and development programs are not properly budgeted for and hiring practices are skewed.

Unmotivated Employees

The indifferent attitude of top management and HR quickly filter across organizational levels and employee hierarchies. Work ethics get affected, there are personality conflicts and teamwork becomes non-existent. There is a gross underutilization of the skills and capabilities of experienced employees. Other talented professionals are not groomed in a generally negative working environment. Poor motivation and lack of incentives and recognition lead to poor performance and even production of poor quality of goods and services.

Employee Demand-Supply Mismatch

Recruiting and selecting employees is a continuous cycle. Based on business growth, expansion plans, and requirements for specific projects and assignments, employees need to be hired. In a mismanaged organization, HR personnel with a lackadaisical attitude and lack of communication with departmental managers and supervisors are hard-pressed to address workforce requirements. Vacancies and job postings don’t get filled in time and key business functions and operations get affected–having a knock-on effect across the organization.

Higher Staff Turnover

Poor human resource planning begins to reflect on the corporate ethos of an organization. The working culture is affected and is generally negative. Performance reviews and performance appraisal systems are badly managed and employees uncertain about their immediate and future prospects. Employee safety practices and working conditions can be compromised at factories and manufacturing facilities. Poor working conditions force many workers to quit. Many other employees are also forced to leave the organization

Impact on Bottom Line

A dysfunctional HR roadmap or ineffective HR management strategy has long-term consequences for an organization. It affects the performance of a business and the productivity levels of employees. Customer service on all fronts gets affected. The loss of customers and medium-term revenues is quite immediate. Over a period of time, the freefall leads to an impact on the bottom line of an organization.

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION: HOW RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION AFFECT THE ORGANIZATION

Organizational culture is often described as the glue that holds a company and its employees together. It is the magic that provides the motivation for employees to find ways to overcome challenges and get things done. How does organizational culture affect the process of hiring in a company? 

During the hiring process, resumes and cover letters may pile up and a company may effectively screen through many candidates using established selection criteria. However, in many cases, it may come down to a selection from a pool of several individuals, all of whom might be well qualified based on their accomplishments and experience. So, how does a company choose the best person to hire when open positions are limited?

What is the difference between Selection and Recruitment?

Outsourcing Small Business Tasks: The Pros And Cons

TIPS FOR MINIMIZING WORKPLACE NEGATIVITY

Finding the right person for the job means finding the person who can work best in the company culture that has already been established.

1. WHAT IS ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE?

Organizational culture is an established way that an organization or work environment functions. The way that employees interact with one another, habits, and norms of day to day activity all make up a company’s culture.

People who fit in with an organization’s existing culture are likely to feel comfortable in the workplace. As long as the existing culture is effective, fitting in leads to working well together. Those who work well together are more likely to offer and accept feedback and constructive criticism, even across managerial levels.

2. CORPORATE CULTURES COULD BE A WORLD APART

While technical, marketing, and business fundamentals may be transferable in some cases from one type of company to another, the cultural upbringing of a candidate in a certain corporate environment could sometimes become the single reason for a new employee to easily adopt the culture of a new company or not be able to fit in at all. Quite often, finding a candidate who has experience working in a similar culture may be more important than finding one with experience specifically in your industry. However, there are always exceptions to the rule.

3. FITTING IN CAN BE MORE BENEFICIAL THAN BACKGROUND

It is important to remember that a person’s background is not always the most important part of the hiring process. Selecting a candidate who gets along with the team may lead to a level of comfort that allows the new hire to introduce new ideas, even if they are different. Sometimes, hiring someone with a different background who fits in with your organizational culture is the best way to go. And this type of information is best noted and captured during the interview process. It helps to have the right recruitment system in place that allows you to easily capture such data in a structured and organized way.

4. CULTURAL MATCHES DECREASE TURNOVER

Another benefit of finding a candidate who fits in with your organizational culture is that if employees enjoy their co-workers and working environment, they are less likely to leave the company. Lower rates of turnover mean less time and money spent on recruiting, hiring, and training.

5. HIRING FOR COMPANY CULTURE VS HIRING FOR SKILL

Resumes, cover letters, and online profiles provide critical information covering background, education, and skills. However, most new candidates require some training on a new job, regardless of their background. Skills can be taught on the job, but fitting in with the existing organizational culture requires an employee mindset that is willing to learn, adjust, and figure out a way to work in the new environment. Getting to know a person during the hiring process can be invaluable, and capturing this information in the candidate management system can ensure that all information is readily available when your team makes a decision.

6. RECRUITING FOR ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE MEANS MARKETING YOUR CULTURE

One of the best ways to find and recruit candidates who fit in with your existing workplace culture is to promote it. A website or job listing that effectively markets your employer brand can demonstrate the culture that exists within your company. As a result, it will attract candidates who can see themselves as part of your team.

7. IS ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE PART OF YOUR HIRING PROCESS?

If your careers site and job postings promote your employer brand and organizational culture, you are more likely to attract candidates who believe they will be a good fit with your business.

When an organization is able to provide modern platforms to those involved in the hiring process, it makes sure that hiring managers, interviewers, and HR personnel are able to easily collaborate, share notes and make good decisions. when looking for people that would be a good fit for your organizational culture.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SELECTION AND RECRUITMENT?

Recruitment refers to the procedure of finding out about prospective candidates for any job opening and encouraging them to get in touch with the company along with applying for the vacancy. In human resource management, the term “recruitment” refers to the tasks involved in searching for and hiring the most eligible and qualified candidate for given job openings, in a cost-effective and timely manner.

Selection refers to a set of activities in which an organization chooses a fixed number of applicants from among the various applicants who may have applied for the job openings. The process of selection incorporates the final appointment of new employees to fill up the seats of the enterprise. 

  1. Recruitment defines the entire process of finding candidates who may be interested in specific job openings. It also involves the different acts of stimulating interested candidates for filing applications. The selection process encompasses the actions of picking up the most eligible candidates from all those who may have filed in their application for a given job opening. The objective of the selection process lies in offering the appointment letter to the most suitable candidates only.
  1. As it is a process that encourages more and more interested applicants to apply for a given job, recruitment is considered a positive process. On the other hand, selection serves to be a costly process in the sense that it leads to the filtering and rejection of all those candidates who are considered unfit for the job on offer.
  1. In terms of the number of applicants, the difference between selection and recruitment lies in more and more job applicants being invited to fill in applications for vacant jobs. Conversely, the number of applicants keeps reducing in the selection process, and only the most eligible candidates for a job opening remain in the end. The appointment letter is given to the candidate/candidates who is/are ready to accept the job on the terms and conditions as specified by the company.
  1. In comparison to the selection process, the activities related to recruitment are simple. This is because recruiters do not go through the processes connected with the scrutiny and assessment of the candidates in any way. Selection serves to be a complicated and well-designed activity comprising of different stages. This is because the companies making the selection have to assess and evaluate the details and skills of interested candidates at each stage. Thorough investigation and the various selection and interview modes have to be applied to freeze upon the most suitable candidates in the lot for filling up the job opening.
  1. The entire recruitment process: consumes less time because it merely involves the identification of the needs of specific job openings. Additionally, it stimulates more and more candidates to file their application for the same. On the other hand, selection incorporates a broader range of activities. The selection tasks begin with the shortlisting of the right candidates and culminate in appointing the most suitable of them all.
  1. In the case of recruitment, an organization notifies interested candidates about the vacancy via different sources like the internet, newspapers, periodicals, magazine, and so forth. The information about job openings is extended to all interested applicants so that they may easily apply. In contrast, the entire process of selection incorporates several steps undertaken by a firm to make sure that the most suitable candidates pass through different stages of selection. Generally, the various stages of selection include submission of forms, written examinations, interviews, medical assessments, etc.
  1. No contractual relationship is established between any parties in case of recruitment. However, in the selection process, both employee and employer sign a contract of employment and are bound by the same.

8. Overall, recruitment serves to be an economical process. On the other hand, the selection is comparatively more expensive.

OUTSOURCING SMALL OUTSOURCING SMALL BUSINESS TASKS: THE PROS AND CONS

These days, it’s easier and more affordable than ever for entrepreneurs to outsource business tasks. While outsouOutsourcing Small Business Tasks: The Pros And Cons

It’s easier and more affordable than ever for entrepreneurs to outsource business tasks. While outsourcing can save you a great deal of time and may even help you save money on personnel costs, outsourcing certain tasks aren’t without risk. Wondering if you should outsource tasks for your repair business? Here is the benefit of outsourcing small business tasks.

Benefits of Outsourcing:

➤ Outsourcing can make it easier for you and your team to spend more time focusing on the most important tasks.

➤ Freedom from menial tasks can help you and your employees achieve a better life/work balance.

➤ Reduction in personnel costs can translate into a greater ability to spend on growth.

➤ Working with freelancers can help you control business expenses and the risk associated with hiring personnel.

Cons of Outsourcing:

➤ Communication issues between contractors and your team.

➤ Contractors may not be aware of the nuances of your business.

➤ Managing contractors can be time-consuming.

Outsourcing Accounting

Bookkeeping, accounting, and payroll are tasks that a huge percentage of small businesses outsource. Many small companies simply don’t have a need for a staff accountant, and managing your own taxes can present risks. 

Outsourcing Marketing and Advertising

While the rise of social media and web-based marketing tools has made it easier than ever for entrepreneurs to tackle marketing themselves, many people simply don’t have the time (or aptitude) to do so. Hence the need to outsource it

Outsourcing Customer Service

Everyone from large, multi-truck businesses to one-man operations are now outsourcing their customer interaction and dispatch. While outsourcing your customer interaction has its benefits – namely, it can save you a great deal of money and time, it doesn’t come without risks. Unless you have the time and resources to ensure that your outsourced customer support team are well-informed on the nuances of your business and well-trained on your policies, your customers may not receive the level of service they’re used to and it may actually harm your relationship with your customers

RECRUITMENT: BENEFITS OF OUTSOURCING FOR SMALL BUSINESSES

Outsourcing — the practice of using outside firms to handle work commonly performed within a company is a familiar concept to many entrepreneurs. Small companies routinely outsource their payroll processing, accounting, distribution, and many other important functions often because they have no other choice. Many large companies turn to cut costs. In response, entire industries have evolved to serve companies’ outsourcing needs.

But not many businesses thoroughly understand the benefits of outsourcing. Outsourcing can indeed save money, but that is not the only (or even the most important) reason to do it. Wise outsourcing however, can provide several long-term benefits:

Control financing costs: Cost-cutting may not be the only reason to outsource but it has certainly a major factor. Outsourcing converts fixed costs into variable costs, releases capital for investment elsewhere in your business, and allows you to avoid large expenditures in the early stages of your business. Outsourcing can also make your firm more attractive to investors since you can pump more capital directly into revenue-producing activities.

Increase in efficiency: Companies that do everything themselves have much higher research, development, marketing, and distribution expenses, all of which must be passed on to customers. An outside provider’s cost structure and economy of scale can give your firm an important competitive advantage.

Lower the labor costs: Hiring and training staff for short-term or peripheral projects can be very expensive, and temporary employees do not always live up to your expectations. Outsourcing lets you focus your human resources where you need them most.

Start new projects quickly. A good outsourcing firm has the resources to start a project right away. Handling the same project in-house might involve taking weeks or months to hire the right people, train them, and provide the support they need. And if a project requires major capital investments (such as building a series of distribution centers), the startup process can be even more difficult.

Concentrate on your core business: Every business has limited resources, and every manager has limited time and attention. Outsourcing can help your business to shift its focus from peripheral activities toward work that serves the customer, and it can help managers set their priorities more openly.

Level the playing field: Most small-firm easily cannot afford to match the in-house support services that larger companies maintain. Outsourcing can help small firms act “big” by giving them access to the same economies of scale, efficiency, and expertise that large companies enjoy.

Reduce risk: Every business investment carries a certain amount of risk. Markets, competition, government regulations, financial conditions, and technologies all change very quickly. Outsourcing providers assume and manage this risk for you, and they generally are much better at deciding how to avoid risk in their areas of expertise.

You can get qualified candidate on our portal www.hrheadhunting.com.

CV REWRITE: WAYS TO WRITE A CV WITH NO EXPERIENCE

You need a job to get experience, but also you need the experience to get a job. What a conundrum!

Just because you don’t have relevant skills or experience from a conventional job doesn’t mean you can’t create a resume that will get you a job.

KEY POINTS YOU SHOULD TAKE NOTE;

  • Open up with a personal statement

Think of it as your resume elevator pitch that sums up who you are professionally and what you can do for the given employer. The personal statement should also address some of the crucial requirements and skills listed in the job posting.

  • Choose a suitable resume format

There are a few dominant resume formats in use today. They have different functions and serve different purposes.

  • The chronological resume presents information in reverse chronological order, with the most recent events being placed first.
  • A functional (skill-based) resume focuses on your skills, accomplishments, job traits, and personal characteristics that employers expect future employees to have.
  • A hybrid resume contains elements of both the chronological and functional styles of resumes by including your relevant skills and accomplishments first and then describing your employment and education in chronological order.
  • Turn your disadvantage into an asset

In other words, don’t get hung up on where you fall short. You need to specify what you can bring to the table. Instead of work experience, it’s best to focus on your education and skills you’ve developed during college and expand these two sections on your resume.

  • Take stock of your achievements and activities

An additional Achievements section can act as an extension of your Education section and will help you fill space on your resume.

  • Treat your internships and extracurricular activities as regular jobs

Despite being unpaid, these activities can showcase your soft skills and help recruiters gauge your professional aptitude. Each one of them should come with a few points that detail the responsibilities you had

  • Add some personality

Recruiters have to deal with many applications for each graduate job. Standing out from the crowd and making yourself memorable is the best move towards getting called in for an interview.

  • Keep it professional even before you become a professional.

If you have any challenges you can always reach out to us  HR Headhunting for professional assistance at a subsidized price.

HOW TO WRITE YOUR CV/RESUME WITH NO QUALIFICATION/EXPERIENCE

Trying to get certain jobs when you don’t have a degree can be tough. Educate yourself on how to adapt your resume.

Are your fellow job seekers leaving you in the dust, nabbing the great jobs because they have educational credentials that you lack? Follow these tips to put your best foot forward on your resume and compete with others who have more impressive educational backgrounds.

Emphasize your strongest credentials

Think about why an employer should hire you out of all the applicants for the job. What do you offer that they don’t? Perhaps you have practical work experience and skills that are relevant to the job. If your experience is stronger than your education, place your work history before education on your resume, and write about your career achievements, track record of results and industry knowledge.

Include a detailed listing of your accomplishments throughout your career. Prove that your work performance has been outstanding and you would be an asset to your future employer’s operation. By the time hiring managers read your resume’s Education section, they should be so impressed by the value you offer that educational shortcomings could be overlooked.

It’s true that some employers will not be interested in you because you lack the job opening’s educational requirement, but you will find other employers that welcome your experience, skills and expertise.

Highlight alternative education and training

Maybe you lack a formal degree, but you’ve participated in ongoing training throughout your career. You can emphasize all of your continuing education by creating a Professional Development section within the Education section. Think about job-related training, certifications, conferences, in-service training, seminars, online learning and even self-directed study. For some professionals, this section can be quite impressive, and showing recent, up-to-date training can be more valuable than a dated degree.

Show in-progress education

Include partially completed or in-progress education.

If you partially completed a program and don’t intend to complete:

Apply even if you lack the educational credential

If you see a job opening that requires a certain level of education and feel you can do the job based on your experience or skills, send your resume anyway. The hiring manager might prefer to hire someone with the stated level of education, but your resume could stand out because of your other qualifications.

Whenever possible, follow up on resumes that you submit. Many employers using electronic resume-tracking systems automatically screen out applicants who don’t meet the educational requirements. You will have a much better chance of convincing an employer that you are a strong candidate if you make a personal connection with a hiring manager.

Return to school

If you continue to hit roadblocks because of your educational background, it might be time to hit the books again. Do whatever it takes to reach your goal: Enroll in night classes, take online courses or start a distance-learning program. The fact that you are pursuing further education could make you more marketable to employers, plus you will be taking steps to ensure you have the credentials to succeed in a competitive job market.

Have a resume review

It’s easier said than done, but don’t let your frustration get to you. Could you use some help strengthening your resume? Get a free resume evaluation today at http://hrheadhunting.com

https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/resume-dilemma-no-degree

TIPS FOR MINIMIZING WORKPLACE NEGATIVITY

Negativity is an increasing problem in today’s workplace. It is the result of a loss of confidence, control, or community.  The first step in solving this problem is to know about the people who think negative. Someone is not satisfied by comparing his increment with a better employee and someone may be as there is out of biscuits in the pantry. Talking with employees can be a great solution but the problem is some people will never say anything in front of anyone.

THE EIGHT TIPS WILL HELP YOU TO MINIMIZE WORKPLACE NEGATIVITY:

  1. TAKE THE EMPLOYEE’S’ INPUT TO MAKE ANY DECISION: 

The most frequent reason for workplace negativity is when a manager makes a decision about a person’s work without his input. Almost any decision that excludes the input of the person doing the work is perceived as negative.

  1. MAKE OPPORTUNITIES FOR PEOPLE TO EXPRESS THEIR OPINION ABOUT WORKPLACE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES:

Recognize the impact of changes in such areas as work hours, pay, benefits, overtime hours, dress code, office locations, job requirements and working conditions. These factors are closer to the heart, mind, and presence of each individual. Changes to these can cause serious negative responses to questions and concerns. To minimize this type of negativity have a meeting with all senior executives every month so that they can share their as well as their subordinates’ opinions.

  1. TREAT PEOPLE EQUALLY: 

Develop and publicize workplace policies and procedures that organize workplace effectively. Apply them consistently. As an example, each employee has the opportunity to apply for leave time. In granting his request, apply the same factors to his application as you would to any other individual as everyone wants to be treated in the same manner.

  1. WHEN JUST A FEW PEOPLE ARE VIOLATING THE NORMS YOU SHOULD NOT CREATE THE RULE FOR ALL: 

You want to minimize the number of rules directing the behavior of adult people at work. Treat people as adults, they will usually live up to your expectations, and their own expectations.

  1. HELP PEOPLE FEEL LIKE MEMBERS: 

Provide the context for decisions and communicate effectively and constantly. If several directions are under consideration, communicate all that you know as soon as you know it. If they don’t feel like members then the output will never be satisfactory.

  1. AFFORD PEOPLE THE OPPORTUNITY TO GROW AND DEVELOP: 

Training, perceived opportunities for promotions, lateral moves for development, and cross-training are visible signs of an organization’s commitment to staff.

  1. PROVIDE APPROPRIATE LEADERSHIP AND A STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK, INCLUDING MISSION, VISION, VALUES, AND GOALS: 

People want to feel as if they are part of something bigger than themselves. If they understand the direction, and their part in making the desired outcomes happen, they can effectively contribute more.

  1. PROVIDE APPROPRIATE REWARDS AND RECOGNITION SO PEOPLE FEEL THEIR CONTRIBUTION IS VALUED: 

The power of appropriate rewards and recognition for a positive workplace is remarkable. Managers just need to find out the good works of their subordinates and keep rewarding on those and advertising those to all.